Tuesday, June 4, 2013

HOW TO DESCRIBE YOUR PAIN TO A HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL


 HOW TO DESCRIBE YOUR PAIN TO A HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL

1. What does the pain feel like? Circle

Aching
Agonizing
Beating
Burning
Cramping
Crushing
Cutting
Drilling
Dull
Electric
Flashing
Freezing
Gnawing
Hurting
Intense
Itchy
Jumping
Nagging
Numb
Penetrating
Piercing
Pinching
Pounding
Pressing
Pricking
Pulling
Pulsing
Quivering
Radiating
Rasping
Scalding
Searing
Sharp
Shooting
Sore
Splitting
Spreading
Squeezing
Stabbing
Stinging
Tearing
Tender
Throbbing
Tight
Tingling
Tugging
Vicious
Wrenching

2. Where does it hurt? Describe your pain- Draw it!

3. Does the pain move? Where does it travel? Does it come and go?

4. Does the pain interrupt your sleep? Do you wake up in the night or in the morning with pain?

5. What is worst and best pain levels recently? ( 1-10 Comparative Pain Scale)

1-10 COMPARATIVE PAIN SCALE

Minor- Does not interfere with most activities. Able to adapt to pain psychologically and with medication or devices such as cushions.
0 = No pain. Feeling perfectly normal.
1 = Very Mild Very light barely noticeable pain, like a mosquito bite or a poison ivy itch. Most of the time you never think about the pain.
2 = Discomforting Minor pain, like lightly pinching the fold of skin between the thumb and first finger with the other hand, using the fingernails. Note that people react differently to this self-test.
3 = Tolerable Very noticeable pain, like an accidental cut, or a doctor giving you an injection. The pain is not so strong that you cannot get used to it. Eventually, most of the time you don't notice the pain. You have adapted to it.
Moderate - Interferes with many activities. Requires lifestyle changes but patient remains independent. Unable to adapt to pain.
4 = Distressing Strong, deep pain, like an minor trauma to part of the body, such as stubbing your toe real hard. So strong you notice the pain all the time and cannot completely adapt.
5 = Very Distressing Strong, deep, piercing pain, such as a sprained ankle or mild back pain. You notice the pain all the time, and are now so preoccupied with managing causing normal lifestyle to be curtailed.
6 = Intense Strong, deep, piercing pain so strong it seems to partially dominate your senses, causing you to think somewhat unclearly. You begin to have trouble holding a job or maintaining normal social relationships.
Severe - Unable to engage in normal activities. Patient is disabled and unable to function independently.
7 = Very Intense Same as 6 except the pain completely dominates your senses, causing you to think unclearly ½ the time. At this point you are effectively disabled and frequently cannot live alone.
8 = Utterly Horrible Pain so intense you can no longer think clearly at all, and have often undergone severe personality change if the pain has been present for a long time.
9 = Excruciating Unbearable pain so intense you cannot tolerate it and demand pain killers or surgery, no matter what the side effects or risk.
10 = Unimaginable Unspeakable pain
You can print this out and take with you each time you go to the Doctor have it filled out in advance this helps doctors to ask more questions about your pain and discomfort.  A handy worksheet!

Remember....Research is the key to your cure!

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